Christopher Troeger

Christopher Troeger, MPH, is a doctoral student at the University of Washington and a pre-doctoral research assistant at the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME). He is currently working on the team modeling COVID-19 deaths and healthcare utilization for IHME. His research interests are diarrheal diseases, lower respiratory infections, and childhood growth and development. Troeger grew up in a ski resort in Colorado and earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees at the University of Colorado. Prior to starting his doctoral program, Troeger was a researcher on the Global Burden of Disease study at IHME.

Governance

Just How Do Deaths Due to COVID-19 Stack Up?

Despite a likely undercount in many places, COVID-19 is the leading killer in most of Latin America and Western Europe

Governance

Reducing the Risk of COVID-19 This Holiday Season

We can save lives by postponing our holiday gatherings until vaccination is widespread

Governance

COVID-19 Has a Strong Chance of Winning on November 3

Surging infection numbers suggest coronavirus cases will continue to increase in every state until the U.S. election

Food

COVID-19 Shows Us It's Time to Tackle Obesity and Overweight

Lessons and cautionary tales from the anti-smoking movement show us a way to move forward

Governance

The Thousand Natural Shocks of COVID-19

Assessing the psychological impacts of coronavirus—first in a two-part series on COVID-19 and its mental health burden

Aging

High-Risk Populations for Severe COVID-19 Infections in the United States

About one quarter of the U.S. adult population could be considered high risk for severe COVID-19 infections

Environment

Wildfires, Air Quality, and the Risk of Lung Diseases

Respiratory diseases caused by invisible "PM2.5" particles released by wildfires are a significant health risk to people

Urbanization

The Attainable Promise of Oral Rehydration Solution

If every kid in the world with diarrhea had access to this simple blend, 300,000 children’s lives a year could be saved